L’Armonica – music with glass armonica

 

Concilium musicum Wien auf Originalinstrumenten

 

Ursula Fiedler, soprano · Sascha Reckert & Philippe Marguerre, glass armonica

conductor and harpsichord: Paul Angerer

 

(live recording of the concert at the Allerheiligen-Hofkirche in Munich from May 21. 2005)


sound samples
reviews
works


order no. CCD 448
EAN 4028183004482

about this recording:

The glass harmonica was invented by Benjamin Franklin in 1761/62, who had attended a concert by a glass player in London. These instruments, called “Musical Glasses”, were very fashionable at that time. Franklin was fascinated by the sound and being a physicist and inventor, he wanted to improve the instruments, by putting the glasses, which produced the tones, closer together. He also wanted them to rotate in order to make the playing easier. Therefore he created hemispherical glass bowls with a small centre piece, which were installed on an axis. The glass bowls decreased in size, so that they would fit into each other. A cork was placed between the glass and the axis; the rotation came from a pedal and a flywheel.

Franklin gave this instrument to the Davis sisters. Cecilia, who was a celebrated singer in Europe, and Marianne, brought the glass harmonica to Vienna, where they were invited by Johann Adolph Hasse. On the occasion of the wedding of archduchess Maria Amalia with Ferdinand, archduke of Parma, Hasse composed “L' Armonica” in 1769. This piece requires not only a huge register of tones – down to low c – but also great virtuosity. It is astonishing, that only Wolfgang Amadé Mozart’s composition for glass harmonica, flute, oboe, viola and violoncello (1791) demands a similar virtuosity for the instrumentalist. Both compositions are superior in their quality to other works for the glass harmonica and mark beginning and end of the heyday of this instrument.

Works:

Karl Leopold Röllig (1754-1804): 1 Rondeau A major for glass armonica and strings

Johann Adolph Hasse (1699-1783) „L’Armonica“, cantata for soprano, glass armonica and orchestra

Wolfgang Amadé Mozart (1756-1791): Adagio and Rondeau for glass armonica, flute, oboe, viol and violoncello KV 617 (Sascha Reckert & Philippe Marguerre, glass armonica · Anni Laflamme, flûte traversiére · Andreas Helm, oboe · Chr. Angerer, viol · Günter Schagerl, violoncello)

Wolfgang Amadé Mozart: aria of Arminda from „La finta giardiniera“, KV 196

Joseph Haydn (1732-1809): symphony C major Nr. 48 „Maria Theresia“ Hob. I:48

sound samples (mp3):
Karl Leopold Röllig:1 Rondeau A major for glass armonica and strings

Johann Adolph Hasse (1699-1783) „L’Armonica“, cantata for soprano, glass armonica and orchestra

2 Introduzione, 3 Aria, 4 Recitativo, 5 Aria

Wolfgang Amadé Mozart: 6 Adagio and Rondeau for glass armonica, flute, oboe, viol and violoncello KV 617

Wolfgang Amadé Mozart: 7 aria of Arminda from „La finta giardiniera“, KV 196

Joseph Haydn: symphony C major Nr. 48 „Maria Theresia“ Hob. I:48

8 Allegro, 9 Adagio, 10 Menuetto. Allegretto, 11 Finale. Allegro

reviews:

© Cavalli Records 2005 zum Seitenanfang